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Title:Sport Ovni Noviny
Description:NOVINI 11 06 2014 1930H, Calling All Cars: The Blood-Stained Coin The Phantom Radio Rhythm of the Wheels, Calling All Cars: Body on the Promenade Deck The Missing Guns The Man with Iron Pipes, Screen Guild Theater: Shadow of a Doubt Rebecca The Devil and Miss Jones
Keywords:Sport Ovni Noviny, WorldNews, World News, Sport Ovni Noviny Breaking News, Video, Videos and Editable pages for News, Sign up and share your playlists, headlines, WN Archive, WN Network, Newspaper, Investigative journalism, journalist, media, Sport Ovni Noviny Global News, Archives, Business, Politics, Sports, Music, Entertainment, Film, Photos, International Headlines, Radio Sport, Live Sport, fm Radio Worldwide, WN, Current Events, Industry, Finance, Economy, Markets, Money, Oil, Energy, Shipping, Offshore, Broadcasts, Audio, Global Issues, Farming, Health, Knowledge, Cities, Technology, Languages, Environment, War, Reports, Geography, Breaking Headlines, Archive
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published: 12 Jun 2014
views: 194
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.
The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.
Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay.
Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.
The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
published: 24 Dec 2012
views: 78178
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.
The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.
Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay.
Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.
The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
published: 24 Dec 2012
views: 43172
Shadow of a Doubt:
Deanna Durbin, Joseph Cotten
Rebecca:
Joan Fontaine, Brian Aherne, Agnes Moorehead
The Devil and Miss Jones:
Laraine Day, George Murphy, Charles Coburn
Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland (born 22 October 1917), known professionally as Joan Fontaine, is a British American actress. She and her elder sister Olivia de Havilland are two of the last surviving leading ladies from Hollywood of the 1930s.
Fontaine is the only actress to have won an Academy Award for a performance in a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, Suspicion.
Fontaine made her stage debut in the West Coast production of Call It a Day in 1935 and was soon signed to an RKO contract. Her film debut was a small role in No More Ladies (1935) (in which she was billed as Joan Burfield).[4]
Although Fontaine, on contract with RKO, had already made her screen appearance in No More Ladies, a series of other minor roles followed, in A Million to One (1937) and Quality Street (1937), opposite Katherine Hepburn. The studio considered her a rising star, and touted The Man Who Found Himself as her first starring role, placing a special screen introduction, billed as the "new RKO screen personality" after the end credit.[5]She next appeared in a major role alongside Fred Astaire in his first RKO film without Ginger Rogers: A Damsel in Distress (1937) but audiences were disappointed and the film flopped. She continued appearing in small parts in about a dozen films, including The Women (1939) but failed to make a strong impression and her contract was not renewed when it expired in 1939, the same year she married her first husband, British actor Brian Aherne. They divorced in 1945.[4]
Fontaine's luck changed one night at a dinner party when she found herself seated next to producer David O. Selznick. She and Selznick began discussing the Daphne du Maurier novel Rebecca, and Selznick asked her to audition for the part of the unnamed heroine. She endured a gruelling six-month series of film tests, along with hundreds of other actresses, before securing the part some time before her 22nd birthday.
Rebecca, starring Laurence Olivier alongside Fontaine, marked the American debut of British director Alfred Hitchcock. In 1940, the film was released to glowing reviews and Fontaine was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress.[4] Fontaine did not win that year (Ginger Rogers took home the award for Kitty Foyle), but Fontaine did win the following year for Best Actress in Suspicion, which co-starred Cary Grant and was also directed by Hitchcock. This is the only Academy Award winning performance directed by Hitchcock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Fontaine
published: 02 Dec 2012
views: 35391
Sport
Sport (UK) or sports (US) are all forms of usually competitive physical activity or games which, through casual or organised participation, aim to use, maintain or improve physical ability and skills while providing entertainment to participants, and in some cases, spectators. Usually the contest or game is between two sides, each attempting to exceed the other. Some sports allow a tie game; others provide tie-breaking methods, to ensure one winner and one loser. A number of such two-sided contests may be arranged in a tournament producing a champion. Many sports leagues make an annual champion by arranging games in a regular sports season, followed in some cases by playoffs. Hundreds of sports exist, from those between single contestants, through to those with hundreds of simultaneous participants, either in teams or competing as individuals. In certain sports such as racing, many contestants may compete, each against all with one winner.
Sport is generally recognised as activities which are based in physical athleticism or physical dexterity, with the largest major competitions such as the Olympic Games admitting only sports meeting this definition, and other organisations such as the Council of Europe using definitions precluding activities without a physical element from classification as sports. However, a number of competitive, but non-physical, activities claim recognition as mind sports. The International Olympic Committee (through ARISF) recognises both chess and bridge as bona fide sports, and SportAccord, the international sports federation association, recognises five non-physical sports, although limits the number of mind games which can be admitted as sports.
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This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License,
which means that you can copy and modify it as long as the entire work (including additions) remains under this license.
Ovni
Ovni is a Spanish-language indy rock band from Buenos Aires, Argentina. The band started when the Segovia brothers, Maxi and Mati, visited Barcelona, Spain in 2000 and quickly integrated into the local music scene. The Spanish word "OVNI" means "UFO" (Unidentified Flying Object). Their music falls into the Post-punk revival of the late 20th and early 21st centuries while demonstrating likenesses to The Strokes and other bands of the Garage rock genre.
Discography
"El Mejor Viaje" - 2012
Y Al Final
Plan B
Cenizas
Esta Vez
El R铆o
Ca铆da Libre
Diablo
El Mejor Viaje
Esa Canci贸n
Sobre Hielo
"Aterrizaje!" - 2007
Aterrizaje
Tu Necesidad
Online
Flores Secas
Soy Un Robot
Uno A Uno
Tal Vez
Siempre Es Tarde
Escribir Con Sangre
30 Grados
"Online!" (CD single) - 2006
Online
30 Grados
"1984" - 2005
Pierdo el control
1984
Sector 13
A 9 a帽os luz
Nunca es suficiente
Antena
Yonqui
Asfixia
Dormir茅 cuando est茅 muerto
No te soporto m谩s
14.000聽km
"Rompiendo Todo" (EP) - 2003
B-Corta
Algo para celebrar
Plasticland
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This page contains text from Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia -
https://wn.com/Ovni
This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License,
which means that you can copy and modify it as long as the entire work (including additions) remains under this license.
Calling All Cars
Calling All Cars may refer to:
Calling All Cars (band), an Australian rock band
"Calling All Cars" (radio program), an old radio program
"Calling All Cars" (film), a 1954 comedy/documentary film starring Cardew Robinson
"Calling All Cars", a song by Senses Fail
Calling All Cars (The Sopranos)
Calling All Cars!, a 2007 downloadable PlayStation Network video game
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This page contains text from Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia -
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This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License,
which means that you can copy and modify it as long as the entire work (including additions) remains under this license.
location on Google Map
Los Angeles Police Department
Coordinates: 34掳03鈥07鈥砃 118掳14鈥40鈥砏锘 / 锘34.051941掳N 118.244514掳W锘 / 34.051941; -118.244514
The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD), officially the City of Los Angeles Police Department, is the law enforcement agency of Los Angeles, California. With 9,843 officers and 2,773 civilian staff, it is the third-largest municipal police department in the United States, after the New York City Police Department and the Chicago Police Department. The department serves an area of 498 square miles (1,290聽km2) and a population of 3,884,307 people.
The LAPD has been fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racism, police brutality, and police corruption.
History
The first specific Los Angeles police force was founded in 1853 as the Los Angeles Rangers, a volunteer force that assisted the existing County forces. The Rangers were soon succeeded by the Los Angeles City Guards, another volunteer group. Neither force was particularly efficient and Los Angeles became known for its violence, gambling and vice.
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This page contains text from Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia -
https://wn.com/Los_Angeles_Police_Department
This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License,
which means that you can copy and modify it as long as the entire work (including additions) remains under this license.
location on Google Map
Los Angeles
Los Angeles (i/l蓲s 藞忙nd蕭蓹l岬籹/ loss AN-j蓹-l蓹s or loss AN-j蓹-liss) (Spanish for "The Angels"), officially the City of Los Angeles and often known by its initials L.A., is the second-largest city in the United States after New York City, the most populous city in the state of California, and the county seat of Los Angeles County.
Situated in Southern California, Los Angeles is known for its mediterranean climate, ethnic diversity, sprawling metropolis, and as a major center of the American entertainment industry. Los Angeles lies in a large coastal basin surrounded on three sides by mountains reaching up to and over 10,000 feet (3,000聽m).
Historically home to the Chumash and Tongva, Los Angeles was claimed by Juan Rodr铆guez Cabrillo for Spain in 1542 along with the rest of what would become Alta California. The city was officially founded on September 4, 1781, by Spanish governor Felipe de Neve. It became a part of Mexico in 1821 following the Mexican War of Independence. In 1848, at the end of the Mexican鈥揂merican War, Los Angeles and the rest of California were purchased as part of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, thereby becoming part of the United States. Los Angeles was incorporated as a municipality on April 4, 1850, five months before California achieved statehood. The city experienced rapid growth with the discovery of oil.
Read more...
This page contains text from Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia -
https://wn.com/Los_Angeles
This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License,
which means that you can copy and modify it as long as the entire work (including additions) remains under this license.
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27:47
NOVINI 11 06 2014 1930H
NOVINI 11 06 2014 1930H
NOVINI 11 06 2014 1930H
87:52
Calling All Cars: The Blood-Stained Coin / The Phantom Radio / Rhythm of the Wheels
Calling All Cars: The Blood-Stained Coin / The Phantom Radio / Rhythm of the Wheels
Calling All Cars: The Blood-Stained Coin / The Phantom Radio / Rhythm of the Wheels
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.
The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.
Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay.
Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.
The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
88:24
Calling All Cars: Body on the Promenade Deck / The Missing Guns / The Man with Iron Pipes
Calling All Cars: Body on the Promenade Deck / The Missing Guns / The Man with Iron Pipes
Calling All Cars: Body on the Promenade Deck / The Missing Guns / The Man with Iron Pipes
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.
The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.
Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay.
Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.
The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
88:59
Screen Guild Theater: Shadow of a Doubt / Rebecca / The Devil and Miss Jones
Screen Guild Theater: Shadow of a Doubt / Rebecca / The Devil and Miss Jones
Screen Guild Theater: Shadow of a Doubt / Rebecca / The Devil and Miss Jones
Shadow of a Doubt:
Deanna Durbin, Joseph Cotten
Rebecca:
Joan Fontaine, Brian Aherne, Agnes Moorehead
The Devil and Miss Jones:
Laraine Day, George Murphy, Charles Coburn
Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland (born 22 October 1917), known professionally as Joan Fontaine, is a British American actress. She and her elder sister Olivia de Havilland are two of the last surviving leading ladies from Hollywood of the 1930s.
Fontaine is the only actress to have won an Academy Award for a performance in a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, Suspicion.
Fontaine made her stage debut in the West Coast production of Call It a Day in 1935 and was soon signed to an RKO contract. Her film debut was a small role in No More Ladies (1935) (in which she was billed as Joan Burfield).[4]
Although Fontaine, on contract with RKO, had already made her screen appearance in No More Ladies, a series of other minor roles followed, in A Million to One (1937) and Quality Street (1937), opposite Katherine Hepburn. The studio considered her a rising star, and touted The Man Who Found Himself as her first starring role, placing a special screen introduction, billed as the "new RKO screen personality" after the end credit.[5]She next appeared in a major role alongside Fred Astaire in his first RKO film without Ginger Rogers: A Damsel in Distress (1937) but audiences were disappointed and the film flopped. She continued appearing in small parts in about a dozen films, including The Women (1939) but failed to make a strong impression and her contract was not renewed when it expired in 1939, the same year she married her first husband, British actor Brian Aherne. They divorced in 1945.[4]
Fontaine's luck changed one night at a dinner party when she found herself seated next to producer David O. Selznick. She and Selznick began discussing the Daphne du Maurier novel Rebecca, and Selznick asked her to audition for the part of the unnamed heroine. She endured a gruelling six-month series of film tests, along with hundreds of other actresses, before securing the part some time before her 22nd birthday.
Rebecca, starring Laurence Olivier alongside Fontaine, marked the American debut of British director Alfred Hitchcock. In 1940, the film was released to glowing reviews and Fontaine was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress.[4] Fontaine did not win that year (Ginger Rogers took home the award for Kitty Foyle), but Fontaine did win the following year for Best Actress in Suspicion, which co-starred Cary Grant and was also directed by Hitchcock. This is the only Academy Award winning performance directed by Hitchcock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Fontaine
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NOVINI 11 06 2014 1930H
published: 12 Jun 2014
Calling All Cars: The Blood-Stained Coin / The Phantom Radio / Rhythm of the Wheels
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.
The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.
Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker...
published: 24 Dec 2012
Calling All Cars: Body on the Promenade Deck / The Missing Guns / The Man with Iron Pipes
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.
The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.
Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker...
published: 24 Dec 2012
Screen Guild Theater: Shadow of a Doubt / Rebecca / The Devil and Miss Jones
Shadow of a Doubt:
Deanna Durbin, Joseph Cotten
Rebecca:
Joan Fontaine, Brian Aherne, Agnes Moorehead
The Devil and Miss Jones:
Laraine Day, George Murphy, Charles Coburn
Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland (born 22 October 1917), known professionally as Joan Fontaine, is a British American actress. She and her elder sister Olivia de Havilland are two of the last surviving leading ladies from Hollywood of the 1930s.
Fontaine is the only actress to have won an Academy Award for a performance in a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, Suspicion.
Fontaine made her stage debut in the West Coast production of Call It a Day in 1935 and was soon signed to an RKO contract. Her film debut was a small role in No More Ladies (1935) (in which she was billed as Joan Burfield).[4]
Although Fontaine, on con...
published: 02 Dec 2012
back span
NOVINI 11 06 2014 1930H
Order: Reorder
Duration: 27:47
Updated: 12 Jun 2014
views: 194
videos
https://wn.com/Novini_11_06_2014_1930H
published: 12 Jun 2014
views: 194
back span
Calling All Cars: The Blood-Stained Coin / The Phantom Radio / Rhythm of the Wheels
Order: Reorder
Duration: 87:52
Updated: 24 Dec 2012
views: 78178
videos
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios...
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.
The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.
Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay.
Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.
The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
https://wn.com/Calling_All_Cars_The_Blood_Stained_Coin_The_Phantom_Radio_Rhythm_Of_The_Wheels
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.
The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.
Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay.
Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.
The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
published: 24 Dec 2012
views: 78178
back span
Calling All Cars: Body on the Promenade Deck / The Missing Guns / The Man with Iron Pipes
Order: Reorder
Duration: 88:24
Updated: 24 Dec 2012
views: 43172
videos
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios...
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.
The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.
Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay.
Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.
The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
https://wn.com/Calling_All_Cars_Body_On_The_Promenade_Deck_The_Missing_Guns_The_Man_With_Iron_Pipes
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.
The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.
Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay.
Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.
The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
published: 24 Dec 2012
views: 43172
back span
Screen Guild Theater: Shadow of a Doubt / Rebecca / The Devil and Miss Jones
Order: Reorder
Duration: 88:59
Updated: 02 Dec 2012
views: 35391
videos
Shadow of a Doubt:
Deanna Durbin, Joseph Cotten
Rebecca:
Joan Fontaine, Brian Aherne, Agnes Moorehead
The Devil and Miss Jones:
Laraine Day, George Murphy, Ch...
Shadow of a Doubt:
Deanna Durbin, Joseph Cotten
Rebecca:
Joan Fontaine, Brian Aherne, Agnes Moorehead
The Devil and Miss Jones:
Laraine Day, George Murphy, Charles Coburn
Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland (born 22 October 1917), known professionally as Joan Fontaine, is a British American actress. She and her elder sister Olivia de Havilland are two of the last surviving leading ladies from Hollywood of the 1930s.
Fontaine is the only actress to have won an Academy Award for a performance in a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, Suspicion.
Fontaine made her stage debut in the West Coast production of Call It a Day in 1935 and was soon signed to an RKO contract. Her film debut was a small role in No More Ladies (1935) (in which she was billed as Joan Burfield).[4]
Although Fontaine, on contract with RKO, had already made her screen appearance in No More Ladies, a series of other minor roles followed, in A Million to One (1937) and Quality Street (1937), opposite Katherine Hepburn. The studio considered her a rising star, and touted The Man Who Found Himself as her first starring role, placing a special screen introduction, billed as the "new RKO screen personality" after the end credit.[5]She next appeared in a major role alongside Fred Astaire in his first RKO film without Ginger Rogers: A Damsel in Distress (1937) but audiences were disappointed and the film flopped. She continued appearing in small parts in about a dozen films, including The Women (1939) but failed to make a strong impression and her contract was not renewed when it expired in 1939, the same year she married her first husband, British actor Brian Aherne. They divorced in 1945.[4]
Fontaine's luck changed one night at a dinner party when she found herself seated next to producer David O. Selznick. She and Selznick began discussing the Daphne du Maurier novel Rebecca, and Selznick asked her to audition for the part of the unnamed heroine. She endured a gruelling six-month series of film tests, along with hundreds of other actresses, before securing the part some time before her 22nd birthday.
Rebecca, starring Laurence Olivier alongside Fontaine, marked the American debut of British director Alfred Hitchcock. In 1940, the film was released to glowing reviews and Fontaine was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress.[4] Fontaine did not win that year (Ginger Rogers took home the award for Kitty Foyle), but Fontaine did win the following year for Best Actress in Suspicion, which co-starred Cary Grant and was also directed by Hitchcock. This is the only Academy Award winning performance directed by Hitchcock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Fontaine
https://wn.com/Screen_Guild_Theater_Shadow_Of_A_Doubt_Rebecca_The_Devil_And_Miss_Jones
Shadow of a Doubt:
Deanna Durbin, Joseph Cotten
Rebecca:
Joan Fontaine, Brian Aherne, Agnes Moorehead
The Devil and Miss Jones:
Laraine Day, George Murphy, Charles Coburn
Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland (born 22 October 1917), known professionally as Joan Fontaine, is a British American actress. She and her elder sister Olivia de Havilland are two of the last surviving leading ladies from Hollywood of the 1930s.
Fontaine is the only actress to have won an Academy Award for a performance in a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, Suspicion.
Fontaine made her stage debut in the West Coast production of Call It a Day in 1935 and was soon signed to an RKO contract. Her film debut was a small role in No More Ladies (1935) (in which she was billed as Joan Burfield).[4]
Although Fontaine, on contract with RKO, had already made her screen appearance in No More Ladies, a series of other minor roles followed, in A Million to One (1937) and Quality Street (1937), opposite Katherine Hepburn. The studio considered her a rising star, and touted The Man Who Found Himself as her first starring role, placing a special screen introduction, billed as the "new RKO screen personality" after the end credit.[5]She next appeared in a major role alongside Fred Astaire in his first RKO film without Ginger Rogers: A Damsel in Distress (1937) but audiences were disappointed and the film flopped. She continued appearing in small parts in about a dozen films, including The Women (1939) but failed to make a strong impression and her contract was not renewed when it expired in 1939, the same year she married her first husband, British actor Brian Aherne. They divorced in 1945.[4]
Fontaine's luck changed one night at a dinner party when she found herself seated next to producer David O. Selznick. She and Selznick began discussing the Daphne du Maurier novel Rebecca, and Selznick asked her to audition for the part of the unnamed heroine. She endured a gruelling six-month series of film tests, along with hundreds of other actresses, before securing the part some time before her 22nd birthday.
Rebecca, starring Laurence Olivier alongside Fontaine, marked the American debut of British director Alfred Hitchcock. In 1940, the film was released to glowing reviews and Fontaine was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress.[4] Fontaine did not win that year (Ginger Rogers took home the award for Kitty Foyle), but Fontaine did win the following year for Best Actress in Suspicion, which co-starred Cary Grant and was also directed by Hitchcock. This is the only Academy Award winning performance directed by Hitchcock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Fontaine
published: 02 Dec 2012
views: 35391
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27:47
NOVINI 11 06 2014 1930H
published: 12 Jun 2014
Play in Full Screen
NOVINI 11 06 2014 1930H
NOVINI 11 06 2014 1930H
Report rights infringement
published: 12 Jun 2014
views: 194
87:52
Calling All Cars: The Blood-Stained Coin / The Phantom Radio / Rhythm of the Wheels
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voic...
published: 24 Dec 2012
Play in Full Screen
Calling All Cars: The Blood-Stained Coin / The Phantom Radio / Rhythm of the Wheels
Calling All Cars: The Blood-Stained Coin / The Phantom Radio / Rhythm of the Wheels
Report rights infringement
published: 24 Dec 2012
views: 78178
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.
The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.
Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay.
Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.
The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
88:24
Calling All Cars: Body on the Promenade Deck / The Missing Guns / The Man with Iron Pipes
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voic...
published: 24 Dec 2012
Play in Full Screen
Calling All Cars: Body on the Promenade Deck / The Missing Guns / The Man with Iron Pipes
Calling All Cars: Body on the Promenade Deck / The Missing Guns / The Man with Iron Pipes
Report rights infringement
published: 24 Dec 2012
views: 43172
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.
The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.
Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay.
Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.
The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
88:59
Screen Guild Theater: Shadow of a Doubt / Rebecca / The Devil and Miss Jones
Shadow of a Doubt:
Deanna Durbin, Joseph Cotten
Rebecca:
Joan Fontaine, Brian Aherne, Agn...
published: 02 Dec 2012
Play in Full Screen
Screen Guild Theater: Shadow of a Doubt / Rebecca / The Devil and Miss Jones
Screen Guild Theater: Shadow of a Doubt / Rebecca / The Devil and Miss Jones
Report rights infringement
published: 02 Dec 2012
views: 35391
Shadow of a Doubt:
Deanna Durbin, Joseph Cotten
Rebecca:
Joan Fontaine, Brian Aherne, Agnes Moorehead
The Devil and Miss Jones:
Laraine Day, George Murphy, Charles Coburn
Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland (born 22 October 1917), known professionally as Joan Fontaine, is a British American actress. She and her elder sister Olivia de Havilland are two of the last surviving leading ladies from Hollywood of the 1930s.
Fontaine is the only actress to have won an Academy Award for a performance in a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, Suspicion.
Fontaine made her stage debut in the West Coast production of Call It a Day in 1935 and was soon signed to an RKO contract. Her film debut was a small role in No More Ladies (1935) (in which she was billed as Joan Burfield).[4]
Although Fontaine, on contract with RKO, had already made her screen appearance in No More Ladies, a series of other minor roles followed, in A Million to One (1937) and Quality Street (1937), opposite Katherine Hepburn. The studio considered her a rising star, and touted The Man Who Found Himself as her first starring role, placing a special screen introduction, billed as the "new RKO screen personality" after the end credit.[5]She next appeared in a major role alongside Fred Astaire in his first RKO film without Ginger Rogers: A Damsel in Distress (1937) but audiences were disappointed and the film flopped. She continued appearing in small parts in about a dozen films, including The Women (1939) but failed to make a strong impression and her contract was not renewed when it expired in 1939, the same year she married her first husband, British actor Brian Aherne. They divorced in 1945.[4]
Fontaine's luck changed one night at a dinner party when she found herself seated next to producer David O. Selznick. She and Selznick began discussing the Daphne du Maurier novel Rebecca, and Selznick asked her to audition for the part of the unnamed heroine. She endured a gruelling six-month series of film tests, along with hundreds of other actresses, before securing the part some time before her 22nd birthday.
Rebecca, starring Laurence Olivier alongside Fontaine, marked the American debut of British director Alfred Hitchcock. In 1940, the film was released to glowing reviews and Fontaine was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress.[4] Fontaine did not win that year (Ginger Rogers took home the award for Kitty Foyle), but Fontaine did win the following year for Best Actress in Suspicion, which co-starred Cary Grant and was also directed by Hitchcock. This is the only Academy Award winning performance directed by Hitchcock.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_Fontaine
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NOVINI 11 06 2014 1930H...
Calling All Cars: The Blood-Stained Coin / The Pha...
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Why psychiatrists are speaking out about Donald Trump's mental health
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The Independent
31 Jan 2017
But why? Read more ....
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photo: AP / Marco Ugarter
Report: Mexican Drug Lord 'El Chapo' Demands Day In Court
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WorldNews.com
31 Jan 2017
Mexican drug lord Joaquin 鈥淓l Chapo鈥 Guzman, one of the world鈥檚 most notorious criminals, is demanding his day in court saying his next US court hearing must be in person and not by video link, Agence-FrancePress reported Tuesday. Judge Brian Cogan last week ordered Guzman, 59, who escaped from prison twice in Mexico, appear by video link for the brief procedural hearing to "minimize disruption from physical transportation.鈥....
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[VIDEO]: Cassini Captures Clearest, Sharpest Close-Up Views Of Saturn's Rings
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WorldNews.com
31 Jan 2017
In the sharpest, clearest high-resolution closeup images of Saturn released thus far, NASA Tuesday showed off spectacular photos of the planet鈥檚 outermost rings captured by the Cassini-Huygens probe, Engadget reported ... In addition, on Dec. 18, 2016, the probe took photos of density "waves" and "wakes," as well....
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photo: Creative Commons / Tony Webster
All you need to know about Trump's H1-B legislation tabled today
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DNA India
31 Jan 2017
Donald Trump has moved from his immigration ban campaign promise to another one - this time to ensure jobs within the country stay with the Americans and don #39;t go to overseas labour. A legislation has been introduced in the US House of Representatives which will serve to overhaul the H1-B and L1 visas that are used by technology companies to often look beyond the American borders in search of skilled talent ... Lofgren ... (With PTI) ... ....
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photo: Creative Commons / Gage Skidmore
The feud between Donald Trump and Arnold Schwarzenegger continues
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The Washington Post
31 Jan 2017
The war of words between the current host of 鈥淐elebrity Apprentice鈥 and the previous one continues. Of course this is no random reality-star war. We鈥檙e talking about former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and President Trump ....
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Southwest Signing Day @ 10am on FOX Sports Southwest FOX Sports GO
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Fox Sports
01 Feb 2017
Southwest Signing Day @ 10am on FOX Sports Southwest FOX Sports GO ... ....
How Celebrating National Girls And Women In Sports Day Can Unlock The C-Suite
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Forbes
01 Feb 2017
This year marks the 31st anniversary of National Girls and Women in Sports Day, a day for celebrating the achievements of women and girls in sports. Research shows that girls who play in sports are more likely to graduate from college, find a job, and be employed in male-dominated industries ... ....
Which Major Sports Leagues' Champions Will Boycott Trump White House Visit
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Forbes
01 Feb 2017
One of the most hallowed recent traditions for the POTUS is to host the reigning champions of the four major North American sports leagues for visit and photo op at the White House. Is a boycott of one of American sport apos;s most fun and celebratory traditions... ....
HISSAN Sports Week
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The Himalayan
01 Feb 2017
KATHMANDU. Einstein Academy, Rosebud HS School, Trinity and Little Angels鈥 College recorded wins in the boys鈥 basketball tournament under the HISSAN Sports Week on Tuesday. Einstein defeated Nepal Mega College 43-21, Rosebud thrashed Whitefield 63-22, Trinity beat Panchari 61-21 and LA defeated KMC 49-25. In girl鈥檚 category, HIMS beat Mega 12-2 ... The post HISSAN Sports Week appeared first on The Himalayan Times ... ....
On the Air | Wednesday's TV/radio sports listings
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The Columbus Dispatch (NewsDB Live)
01 Feb 2017
Golf11 p.m.. PGA Euro. Dubai Classic, Golf #xa0;High school football7 p.m.. Signing Day Special, Spectrum Sports (formerly Time Warner Cable Sports Channel) #xa0;Men #x2019;s basketball6.30 p.m.. Penn State-Indiana, BTN7 p.m.. Syracuse-N.C. State, ESPN27 p.m.. #xa0;Central Florida-Houston, [...] ... ....
Sports on TV: Three Thunder telecasts top OKC ratings for the week
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The Oklahoman
01 Feb 2017
Three Thunder telecasts, including national broadcasts on Thursday and Sunday, topped the Oklahoma City TV sports ratings for the week....
C. Jakarta will Enhance 53 Sport Facilities and Infrastructures
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Berita Jakarta
01 Feb 2017
Central Jakarta Sport and Youth Sub-Dept. in 2017 plans to enhance 53 sport facilities and infrastructures which spread in eight sub-districts ... Central Jakarta Sport and Youth Sub-Dept. Head, Tedi Cahyono said that the enhancement and sport facilities construction is based on citizen's aspiration. ....
(Soccer) Monaco loan Elderson to Sporting Gijon
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Hong Kong Standard
01 Feb 2017
French league leader Monaco is sending Nigerian left back Elderson to Spanish club Sporting Gijon on loan until the end of the season. ... Other Sports breaking newsMore Sports news ....
Sports Betting Company, NairaBet, Renews Craze Clown Deal
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This Day
01 Feb 2017
Shooting Stars Sports Club (3SC) of Ibadan shirt sponsors, NairaBet, tuesday renewed its partnership with Nigerian comedian, Emmanuel Ogonna Iwueke, popularly known as Craze Clown on Instagram and SnapChat ... 鈥淲e as a sports betting company are proud of the impact Craze Clown has on our brand ... The official hinted that very soon, the company 鈥 is going to be involved in other sports related events very soon....
Tonight in sports news: The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show will feature three new breeds ...
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Deadspin
01 Feb 2017
Tonight in sports news. The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show will feature three new breeds this year; the sloughi (above); the American hairless terrier (hairless); and the pumi (fluffy) ... ....
Tuesday's high school sports roundup
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Worcester Telegram
01 Feb 2017
Box scores and recaps from the day in high school sports ... ....
Nevada awaits Supreme Court ruling on sports betting
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Review Journal
01 Feb 2017
With millions expected to be wagered illegally on the upcoming Super Bowl, Nevada and gaming officials are eagerly awaiting a U.S. Supreme Court decision on whether states should be allowed to offer legal sports betting ... ....
Smithfield pares down concession building request at Luter sports complex
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Daily Press
01 Feb 2017
Smithfield pared down its bid request for the Joseph Luter Jr. Sports Complex concession building to elicit a lower construction cost after rejecting all four bids it received for the project in December. The original design, which included a concession stand, storage space and a multipurpose room, ... ....
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